HandMade in America talks with CSA artist Carla Filippelli

Image

Who or what are your major influences?
The inspiration for all of our creations from the very beginning has been the endless acts of creation of/by Mother Nature.  Our first focus, in 1979 was extracting colors from the many dye plants of Western North Carolina.   This extraction and the process of dyeing fibers and reeds opened our eyes to the hidden secrets within the natural world. Shape and color of course are apparent everywhere but to focus on the acts of creation itself have been our real inspiration.   After many years of traditional Appalachian basketry and using patterns of all kinds, we discovered the weavers within nature.  The animals that do not use easily recognizable patterns were our guides and teachers.  We watched spiders and birds at work, particularly the weaver birds; we observed beavers weave their logs into dams and noticed the tiniest mouse nest was woven from soft, found materials.   Suddenly we had become free from traditional patterns, and our work reflected this immediately and has never been the same. That’s when I developed the random weave style of weaving.  Some of our shapes for the baskets were inspired by the traditional forms of Appalachian basketry other shapes came out of a more random process that the weave dictated.

What’s your design process like?
We really enjoy creating large wall sculptures for residences or corporate spaces.  Working with clients about color, interiors, shapes etc is what informs us of what we want to design. Then a very left brain process takes place and we let the wild vines and reeds guide us to free flowing shapes and palettes that we feel will work with the design process.
Custom colors and sizes are our specialty, and working closely with clients is how we achieve good results.

Can you give me an example of something that inspired a particular piece of work?
Much of our inspiration comes from the natural world. We were on vacation in British Columbia a few years back and spent time on the rocky beaches playing with the long lengths of bull kelp that flowed up on the shores making interesting shapes and designs in the sand.It washed up and held onto other surf side stuff. We got inspired to create a large sculptural wall piece that flowed over a long 16 foot wall as the entry wall of a newly built condo in downtown Asheville; 60 N Market Street.

How have you changed as a consequence of your work?
Working my whole life in craft and as a craft artist has given me the greatest gift; self employment.  It has given me the freedom to work and play when inspired. Now I am able to  give back to the craft community through mentoring and volunteering.

How is your work integrated with the community?
We have worked with art consultants and designers who have gotten our work in several corporate and commercial  establishments around the state and nation. We also had a stint as artists in the Arts in Embassies program which loaned our pieces to foreign countries and ambassadors’ homes.
As members of the Southern Highland Guild since 1983, the craft community has always been an inspiration and resource as we grew into seasoned craft artists.

What’s the most rewarding part about your work?    
I am rewarded  every day getting to walk to work; to my little studio nestled in the woods. Even when the demands of marketing, deadlines or material shortages show up, I can always stop, breathe a little deeper and say “ how lucky are you creating and sharing work I have made myself. “

Advertisements

CSA: Community Supported Art!

February 27, 2013

We are so excited here at HandMade about this new business incubator program, and apparently, so is the Mountain Xpress! Click HERE to see the write-up online…

csa big

Over the last 20 years, Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) has become a popular way for consumers to buy seasonal food directly from local farms. With that buy-local spirit in mind, Community Supported Art is a similar endeavor to support regional craft artists and collectors.

We are seeking craft artists to launch our inaugural Community Support Art (CSA) program. Our local CSA program is modeled after the Community Supported Art project created by Springboard for the Arts and mnartists.org in Minnesota, where it continues successfully season after season.

Join us in becoming the first Community Supported Art program in North Carolina!

Vist our homepage HERE

We want to share three HIA

events with you!

There is a big week ahead for February 13th-17th and we want to invite all to come join us at the HandMade in America Gallery Monday for HIA’s Craft Lab series, Wednesday for HIA’s Textile Study Group, and Friday for the Opening Reception of In Our Own Words: Language as Craft.

*Also don’t miss out on the 25th National Grove Park Inn Arts & Craft Conference and the Arts & Craft Heritage Week February 12-18th. Mayor Terry Bellamy recently signed an official proclamation designating the week of February 12th-18th as Arts & Crafts Heritage Week. Follow the link above to find the schedule of Arts & Craft Heritage Week.

Monday Feb 13 Craft lab 6-8pm @ HandMade in America Gallery

How to Tell Your Story.

Telling stories is how we identify, learn, and share our history. If your goal is to educate, persuade, or simply connect in a meaningful way with a particular audience, storytelling is the single most powerful communication tool available to you and can be your best selling tool.

Come learn how to tell your story as a craft maker. Executive Director Gwynne Rukenbrod will teach you the importance of learning how to tell your unique story and hone your skills at story telling. Gwynne will talk about the three steps in a good story and group exercises will lead you through each step of YOUR story.

Wednesday Feb 15 Textile Study Group 5:30-7 pm

Tencel, Bamboo, Rayon, Modal…What are they really?
Led by Karen Donde

Manufactured, regenerated fibers come from natural plant sources, but are extruded as filaments in manufacturing. This presentation will focus on the content of these yarns, how they are processed, and the performance properties of each. It will include samples of the yarns and products woven with them.

Karen Donde weaves garments, accessories, and home textiles for sale and teaches a variety of weaving classes and workshops at Sutherland Handweaving Studio in the Cotton Mill Studios in Asheville’s River Arts District. All are welcome.

Friday Feb.17th 5:30-8pm @ HandMade in America Gallery .

In Our Own Words: Language as Craft Opening Reception

Artists describe finished works with carefully selected language, but can craft depict language when words are chosen before the act of physical expression? Inspiration was found by a community of local WNC artists, by asking just that. February 13 through May 4, 2012, HandMade in America presents a collection with distinctly different artistic process. In Our Own Words: Language as Craft features eleven local craft artists that share the results of this creative experiment.

Personally-resonant words chosen by each artist as the impetus for making the object. “We find not the phrasing to describe our work, but rather the craft to depict our language”, says one of the artists. From fine furniture and woven sculpture to exquisitely created wall pieces, In Our Own Words is a playful exhibit with visual, verbiage and vital messages.

Artists featured in this exhibition are: Fatie Atkinson, Caryl Brt, Hayley Davison, Melissa Engler, Carla and Greg Filippelli, Wayne Fowler, Susan Link, Journel Thomas, Jenna Weston, and Jamie Womack. Opening Reception will be Friday February 17 from 5:30–8 pm at the HandMade in America Gallery at 125 South Lexington Avenue, Suite 101, beside Storm Restaurant on Hilliard Avenue.

Here is a sneak peek of some words and definitions that inspired a few of the exhibit’s pieces

"Inspiration"by Fatie Atkinson and Wayne Fowler

Inspiration: [in-spuh-rey-shuhn] stimulation to do creative work: stimulation for the human mind to creative thought or to the making of art.

"Unfettered" by Caryl Brt

Unfettered: [uhn-fet-er] to release from fetters. to free from restraint; liberate.

"Disclosure" by Melissa and Yvonne Engle

Disclosure: [dih-skloh-zher] To make known; reveal or uncover: allow to be seen; lay open to view: open up or unfold. 

"Fire" by Susan Link

Fire: [fahyuhr] 1. kindle, ignite 2. stir,enliven (the imagination)

Talk to the artists and get their explanations and perspectives at the Opening Reception Friday February 17th, 5:30-8pm.  See you soon!

Unique Inspiration for Craft

HandMade in America Presents a Display of Verbal Expression through Craft 

In Our Own Words: Language as Craft Exhibition

February 13- May 4, 2012

Artists describe their finished works with carefully selected language, but can craft depict our language when the words to describe it are chosen before the act of physical expression?  Inspiration was found, by a community of local WNC artists, by asking just that. HandMade in America is excited to present a collection with a distinctly different artistic process. In Our Own Words: Language as Craft features eleven local craft artists that will each share the results of this creative experiment at Handmade in America February 13 through May 4, 2012.

In a reversal of the usual process of making an object and then explaining it in words, a personally-resonant word was first chosen by each artist as the impetus for the making of an object. “We find not the phrasing to describe our work, but rather the craft to depict our language”, says one of the artists.  From fine furniture and woven sculpture to exquisitely created wall pieces, In Our Own Words is a playful exhibit with visual, verbiage and vital messages.

Opening Reception will be held Friday February 17 from 5:30 – 8 pm at HandMade in America offices at 125 South Lexington Avenue, Suite 101, beside Storm Restaurant. Please plan to join us as we continue to support craft artists living in WNC.

Here is a sneak peek of some words and definitions that inspired a few of the exhibit’s pieces

"Inspiration"by Fatie Atkinson and Wayne Fowler

Inspiration: [in-spuh-rey-shuhn] stimulation to do creative work: stimulation for the human mind to creative thought or to the making of art.

"Unfettered" by Caryl Brt

Unfettered: [uhn-fet-er] to release from fetters. to free from restraint; liberate.

"Disclosure" by Melissa and Yvonne Engle

Disclosure: [dih-skloh-zher] To make known; reveal or uncover: allow to be seen; lay open to view: open up or unfold. 

"Fire" by Susan Link

Fire: [fahyuhr] 1. kindle, ignite 2. stir,enliven (the imagination)

—————————————–

Talk to the artists and get their explanations and perspectives at the Opening Reception Friday February 17th, 5:30-8pm.  See you soon!